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showdown from showdown? and how will the economy respond to what is or is not accomplished here in washington? my exclusive guest this morning will have something to say about all of this. house budget chairman and the republican party's 2012 vice presidential nominee paul ryan here for his first live interview since the election. chairman, welcome back to meat meet. >> great to be back with you. >> let's talk about this top priority of the budget battle. it will really mark the beginning of the president's second term. the debt ceiling has been raised, at least temporarily, but there are still big decisions to be made. you specifically said in the last few days that your priority is to make a big down payment on the debt. a debt crisis that you see in this country. >> that's right. >> what do you specifically require? what's the priority? what has the president got to do in your point of view? >> i'll just explain what the speaker said when we passed that bill. our goal is to get cuts and reforms that put us on a path to balancing the budget in a decade. we think the senate oug
to put his time. >> brown: well, you know, he spoke about the economy, getting the economy right first and foremost. he said "more than ever foreign policy is economic policy." did that sound right to you? >> i think that's right and i think this is a man who's grown up, really, in the political military side of foreign policy and national security and i think one of the challenges will be for him to recognize that the economic instrument in trade is really very important. if you look at asia, the coin of the realm in asia is trade and economics and, you know, if we're going to have a rebalancing toward asia, it needs to be an economics and trade overwhelmingly. so he's got, i think, a real opportunity to help lead the administration in using all of our instruments for national power influence, particularly economic and trade. >> brown: what do you think -- i mean, i know what you think about -- we talked about this in your last book about the need for economic thinking, i guess, changing the way we think about the world. but do you think that the administration has understood that wel
and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the process was set
spend more. that's not going to help the economy, and that is not going to close the gap and balance the budget. the reason we want to balance the budget is not to make the numbers add up. we think that's necessary for growth and opportunity. we think it's necessary to make sure that our kids don't get this debt that they won't be able to handle if we keep going down the path we are on. >> but there are certainly those in the white house who would take issue with what you said or might even say to use your own criticism that's a straw man argume argument. they were prepared to cut additional spending to be part of a bigger agreement that republicans weren't able to agree to. there is more room for spending cuts. it's a matter of how you do it. >> the president was insisting on more stimulus spending during the fiscal cliff negotiations. he didn't get that. they haven't put out a plan. the reason we wanted the debt limit extended was to showcase our budget. we will put a budget up that says here is our plan for economic growth and balancing the budget, entitlement reform which is nece
hadley and zbigniew brzezinski weigh in. >> brown: paul solman looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. military has a new order of the day: working up plans for putting women on the front lines. the proces
korea will have long-rangl the other things happening with the economy, with china. >> you wanted him to talk about that kind of stuff and he didn't. >> none of it was about that. and the american people -- we deserve some explanations here. yesterday, with secretary clinton: why have you not got an anybody who dead the benghazi attacks? we now know the same people are right out in the open admitting they did it. they're in algeria. we just had a warning today there's potentially another attack coming against westerners in benghazi. the second question, why did you fail to secure could -- gadhafi good's weapons before toppling him. those are the weapons we're seal all over the place, and the third thing i'd like to get some answers for, how are you going to protect all those american civilians who are staying behind after american troops leave the region. >> a good thing you weren't asking questions. we give a lot of money to this region. what are we getting for it? >> very little. that's one over the big problems with foreign aid. i like and believe in foreign aid. i think it's a lo
catch up. you'll shut down the economy and you won't get the budget down. >> when you were campaigning in virginia, a state you wanted to carry but didn't, you said, look, these sequestration cuts, these automatic spending cuts that are put in place because republicans and democrats can't agree, so you have to have this sword that comes down, you said we're not going to let those happen. those will not happen, those automatic spending cuts. well, now we have a new deadline coming up in a couple of months that says there's going to be more automatic spending cuts, the same ones that were in place before. >> that's right. >> are you going to let those happen? >> if mitt romney and i won the election, they would not have happened because we would have gone and worked with democrats and republicans in congress to put the budget on a path to balance and saved defense. i think the sequester is going to happen because that $1.2 trillion in spending cuts, we can't lose those spending cuts. and don't for get one other thing. i wrote legislation and passed it in the house twice to replace those
at a steady pace since he returned to office last month, retooling the economy, revising foreign policy and reviewing national defense. now he's taken time to pause and sum up his vision for the country. abe spoke before the diet for the first time since his liberal democratic party took power. the prime minister said the economy is his top priority. he noted deflation and the strong yen are shaking japanese people's belief that working hard will bring rewards. >> translator: i will restore a strong economy and unshakable determination. i will press ahead with my three areas of economic policy, bold monetary measures, a fiscal policy and a growth strategy that induces private investment. >> abe urged lawmakers to swiftly pass extra budget bills for the current fiscal year to pay for stimulus measures. he said his spending measures won't go on forever and that he aims to achieve healthy public finances. the prime minister then turned his attention to diplomacy and national security. he said japanese and u.s. leaders should strengthen their alliance to restore the tight bond their countri
on the economy and that, but not at the expense of social security, medicare, and medicaid >> we, the people, still believe that every citizen deserves a basic measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. lori: the president giving his second inaugural address this morning. rich edson now joining us from washington d.c., and that was certainly a politically partisan address we heard from the president. >> reporter: well, it was a defense of the political theory, awaited the u.s. should be governed and should govern itself. i would almost characterize it as something along the lines of a response to what we heard from president reagan in 1981 when he said government is not the solution to our problems, it is the problem. president obama making the case that the government is not necessarily our problem. together we could do great things. together w
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
to note with after almost four years having passed with an economy that's been struggling, the senate never acted. it took one week in which their paychecks were on the line that now the senate is going to step up and do the right thing. we welcome them to this debate around the budget of the nation and look forward to making sure we can begin to reduce the mountain of debt that is facing our children. >> when you go across the country and talk to individuals, they're always stunned. it has been four years since the senate did a budget. when they stood back and looked the last time they did a budget, the ipad wasn't introduced or chevy volt and no instagram. it's shocking. today, you found a bipartisan vote that is asking for accountability and effectiveness in government and that's why we are moving it and we welcome the opportunity that the senate joins the debate and actually brings accountability back. >> today, the house acted. the house acted to put washington on a budget and to force a conversation about how we spend money. everyone in america understands that budgets matter. a
the world as we continue. stay with us. lou: the obama economy in tonight's "chalk talk" we take a look at the obama economic failure. anti-gun advocate started as seven democrat, and day distort his campaign ad. he supports the second amendment steven haze of the weekly standard, a former bush special assistant to next. ♪ [ male announcer ] where do you turn for legal matters? at legalzoom, we've created a better place to handle your legal needs. maybe you have questions about incorporating a business you'd like to start. or questions about protecting your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like to find the right attorney to help guide you along, answer any questions and offer advice. with an "a" rating from the better business bureau legalzoom helps you get personalized and affordable legal protection. in most states, a legal plan attorney is available with every personalized document to answer any questions. get started at legalzoom.com today. and now you're protected. [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the clou
in the red for 2012. the world's third biggest economy has posted a trade deficit of $78.3 billion. u.s. house ever presented this has passed a bill to extend the debt limit until may. it effectively put off the possibility of the u.s. defaulted on its debt. three weeks earlier, congress and the white house hammered out the last-minute deal to prevent the so-called fiscal cliff. the u.s. debt stands at $16.50 trillion. the british prime minister has been building on wednesday's historic speech about his country's future with the european union. david carolwood speaking at the world economic forum -- david cameron was speaking at the world economic forum in switzerland. >> britain has a choice purdue and hope it stands back and the argument -- britain has a choice. they can stand back or say yes, the european union needs to change to suit the euro but also to suit all of us as well. make the argument for a flexible, competitive euro, take the british people with you. >> south africa is looking at newark power for its future nuclear ended -- at nuclear power for its future and nuclear e
to have more control over our economy, more taxes, more regulations, more spending. there's a fundamental difference between the president's view of our future and reality and so when the president gives an inaugural address and doesn't address the national debt that's how difficult it is to get anything done. >> greta: what is the reasonable expectation for the american people is going to happen. i mean, knowing the president and knowing that he's in power and knowing that democrats are here in power in the senate and republicans in the house and all the people, all the different interests. what's going to happen? >> i think, look, we're going to have to win some elections and get people up here in both chambers that are going to take this issue seriously. >> greta: and all parties. >> i think in our party-- everybody knows it's inevitable. the time will come when we have to deal with the issues and the sooner we deal with it, the better off we'll be. if we deal with them now we deal with them on terms. the longer we wait to save medicare, the more disruptive it's going to be, the more c
% of the entire budget of government at a time that the world is getting smaller, that our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world, that we face a more global market than any time in our history, so not just in my briefings a s at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders, in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, to refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i have been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world and particularly, i think, there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interests. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work very closely with this committee, mr. chairman, mr. ranking member, not just because it would be my responsibility but because i will not be able to do this job effectively, nor will our country get what it needs to out of these initiatives without your involvement and your ideas going forward. so thank you, mr. chairman and members of the
and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all around the world. the weakened cash in on that. would not have to wait on it. -- we can cash in on that. we do not have to wait on it. we need to keep doing what we're doing. it is going to mean a tremendous amount of jobs. we have seen that all through the midwest. north dakota is certainly a huge example of it. they say now there is to% and unemployed -- 2% unemployed there. we cannot find those folks. [laughter] we're s
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
and the germans do that, they do it right. but with some failing economies are weak economies that heavily depend on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry. david notes that can go up and down. and so, two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage much outside the borders. and i don't think they have the financial resources to do is manage as we think they should do and maybe even some policy people think they should do relative to their military strength. if salaries were just not in a position to do that now there's been a heavy reliance on u.s. president says that diminishes the tough decisions to make as are other nations. yes, ma'am, her. >> of learning. barbara mathews of bcm analytical as. i've got a question about the 21st century with large. you have described what sounds like you consider to be as inevitable retrenchment if not a potential return to some isolationists in the united states whether for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a very different position than america as a guarantor of security and liberty locally. europe may not
as we think about the economy of the united states coming and as you point out, the other developing countries around the world. one of the efforts of this administration has been to promote business advocacy abroad for domestic businesses at home. i led a trade mission to india about a year and a half ago with a number of businesses from new and church, and they talked about how important it was to have that support from the state officials in india as they were looking to try to establish those business relationships. can you talk about how you might continue that and continue that this is something you would be focused on an unwilling to continue to support? >> well, as i said in my opening, i think foreign policy is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury
increase and protected our economy from the fiscal cliff. two-thirds of those votes came from democrats. if the speaker had enforced the hastert rule, we would be over the fiscal cliff today. what happened on sandy? after nearly three months of stalling, while my state, while the presiding officer's state of connecticut, while the states of new york, new jersey and other states struck by sandy were waiting urgently for the relief that we got to the coast within 11 days. they stalled and they stalled because they could not get a majority of the republican caucus to support federal relief for our hurricane-ravaged states. under the hastert rule, they couldn't get that bill to the floor. so speaker boehner once again decided to forego the hastert rule. that's how they got the sandy emergency aid bill passed. look again at the votes. republican "yes" votes for the disaster bill: 49. republican "no" votes for that bill: 179. that bill was dead on arrival under the hastert rule. the republican caucus couldn't support it, wouldn't support it, and we would be without any help now if they follow
and a stable economy as a means to security and stability. i think the concerns are many. the concerns are around africa com in 2008 at a time when africa surpassed the middle east in its supply of oil to the united states and the concern of the u.s. of africa and oil and a vital resource is the true rationale for africacom, as well as countering china in that theater where china is increasing its influence. the concern was heightened before africacom was heightened. concern has grown over time. is there any effort to evaluate africacom? i understand your stepping down as a new commander steps in. there has been a congressional hearing on benghazi, but clearly there is a bigger issue at stake and that is u.s. foreign-policy with regards to africa. thank you. >> thank you. it will not surprise you that i disagree with most of what you said, which is ok here k. we live in a country where you can do that. it is true that the state department has the authority for security assistance matters. some of that 8-9,000,000,000 dollars that is spent in africa does in fact go to security assistanc
was just circumstances, the economy wasn't bad enough to fire obama and the republican party, its brand was still being dragged down with the association through the financial crisis in iraq and sundry other leftovers of the bush years? >> i think the clearest way to look at this is to look at 2010. 2010 was a resounding rejection of what obama had done in the first two years. it was a resounding rejection of the inintrusiveness expansion of the government. it essentially was a referendum on this kind of hyper liberalism and a referendum on the question of the size, the scope, the reach of government, and it was kind of a pure ideological election, because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for a president, you weren't voting up and down on a figure, you were voting on issues. and the don't instant -- dominant issue was obama, was the increase in spending, was essentially the expansion of government. or to put it a more abstract and grand way, the relationship between citizen and state which obviously was tilting towards state. so -- and there when the question is
% of the entire budget of the government. at a time when the world is getting smaller, our economy depends on its relationship with every other country in the world's comment we face a more global markets at any time in our history. not just in my briefings at the state department, but in my conversations with business leaders and in my trips to crisis areas, to war zones, refugee camps, and in some of the poorest countries on earth, i've been reminded of the importance of the work our state department does to protect and advance america's interests and do the job of diplomacy and a dangerous world. i think there is more that can be done to advance our economic capacity and interest. in this debate and in every endeavor, i pledge to work closely with this committee. not just because it will be my responsibility, but because i will not be able to do this job effectively without your involvement and your ideas going forward. thank you, mr. chairman and members of the committee. i know there is a lot of ground to cover. >> [inaudible] [indiscernible] >> when i first came to washington and testified,
looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
to the united states. chattanooga, tennessee has a smart idea on how to get the economy growing there. hire the best and brightest minds of technology and lure them with them. holding a competition and putting up a mart grid that sends out super fast high speed internet. here is more from atlanta. i hear business leaderships paying big money for people to move there. >> businesses and nonprofits are contributing to a number of initiatives and harris, so-called geeks are moving to chattanooga. >> as other cities struggle to create jobs and prosper, chattanooga, tennessee has a plan to grope th economy at the speed of light. >> our internet is litterally hundred times faster than the national average. >> there is a square mile grid of cable. fastest internet in the nation and it is called the gig and they are hoping to leverage it into jobbings. >> no other city has it on the level we have it and so that is a big recruiting tool. >> the city is luring business and residents. first the geek move. a generous relocation package for anyone who moves to the city and takes a tech-related job. incen
for not separating people and understanding the things they contribute to the american economy and society. if the republicans hold up the legislation, is it enough for the republicans that they have spokes people like marco rubio out there? does that build enough of a tent for hispanics to come in? >> not if they have a bill. latinos are clear on this. no bill, no support. rubio talked about it being a piecemeal. it has to be aim comprehensive large package, but i think they're going to get there, and the main reason is not just the election returns and 71% that obama got of latino voters. it's that business is for this. even in the republican districts that don't care about the votes that obama got. they do care about what their local business leaders think, and they want a bill. i think actually this is going to be quite a bit easier than a lot of people think. >> business is -- >> i never thought i would call jonathan naive. >> i know, but what's happened -- >> what's the difference now? >> because -- >> he didn't listen for half a decade. >> here's the difference. >> nativism, going b
, but really masking the deep economic problems that are plaguing egypt right now. and the spanish economy where the poor are bearing the brunt of the troubles -- in the economy were the poor are bearing the brunt of the troubles. people see rising prices of basic staple goods, tax hikes on subsidies. this is what many criticize and why many are protesting today, what they say is the brotherhoodization of the state. they're saying the brotherhood [indiscernible] for its own political gain. there is a sense instead of trying to reform the state, the muslim brotherhood are instead try to take it over. so that we switch from mubarak to morsi. that is what the main calls are for in this protest today. many are also calling for accountability and justice, retribution for the many hundreds of protesters that have been killed, the many thousands more that have been wounded. today only to low ranking policemen are in prison for killing hundreds of protesters. people see there is no accountability. the police continue to act toward impunity. we're seeing clashes break out right now in the outskirts
and india and we could do significant harm to the u.s. economy i think by putting additional rules and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and ene
to correct this injustice. and in this tough economy now more than ever before women are the last line of economic defense for themselves and their children, working to keep a roof over their family's head and food on the table. that is why we need the paycheck fairness act without delay. it is time for the congress to act and give women a fighting chance to receive fair pay for their hard work. it's time to get this legislation to the president's desk. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back her time. the house will be in order. please take conversations outside of the chambers. for what purpose does the gentleman from indiana rise? >> unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today to recognize national school choice week, which has grown from 200 organizations and 150 events in 2011, to 500 organizations in more than 3,500 events this year. national school choice week highlights the benefits of school choice
and tell people it is going to save their economy, when actually it devastates local communities. >> hundreds of people gathered in new york city on saturday for a public memorial service honoring and schwartz, the internet freedom activist who took his own life earlier this month. he was weeks before trial date for downloading millions of articles provided by the nonprofit research service jstor at mit. swartz was facing 35 years in prison, a penalty supporters called excessively harsh. at the memorial, aaron swartz's partner, taren stinebrickner- kauffman, called for prosecutors to be held accountable. >> on last friday he face the prospect of yet another three months of uncertainty of ups and downs of being forced by the government to spend every fiber of his being on this damnable, since this trial. with no guarantee could exonerate himself at the end of it. he was so scared and so frustrated and so desperate and more than anything, just so weary. i think he just could not take it another day. aarib would have loved to have been here because of the last week, phoenix's are al
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)